Creative Works of Tom McGuire

Whats all the Clatter About?

2007/03/23 · No Comments

    Here’s another easy way to do something fun. And I know my friend Tab really likes noise. Take a toy motor and attach a short wire across the shaft like a “T”.  You could use glue or tape or here I used a peice of plastic rod. Then bend loops on both ends of the wire. Throught those loops make rings of wire that dangle like chain links. So as the motor spins the links swing out.

               Clatter2Now the fun part. Mount the motor into some foam plastic. Then around the motor you can put steal or aluminum rods or tubing that will have jingle sound when the motor spins. Or you could use wood or plastic that will clatter.      Click this picture to see the movie.

                                Clatter1 

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Make a Bufferfly Fly

2007/03/22 · No Comments

    When you need to do a lot of pushing and pulling use a motor and a screw.  The tricky part is attaching the screw to the motor so that it doesn’t wobble too much but sometimes that can be a good thing. Here we have a butterfly made of red craft foam sheet suspended three wires. A wire attached to each wing and one in the middle. The middle wire is connected to a nut on the screw that goes up and down as the motor turns forward and backward.

Click the picture below to see it work. Just imagine a whole flock of these.

ArtButterfly

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A Wild Flower

2007/03/22 · No Comments

                     Here’s a simple fun idea for a kinetic art. Take some wire and wind it around a post or a cone or any shape. Then mount the bottom to a base and attach a small electric motor to the top. craft some sort of flower and hook it to the motor shaft off center, so it will wobble when it turns. Connect a bettery to the motor lead wires and have fun.

                         WildFlower

Its really fun. Click the picture to watch the video.

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Logochips as Slaves

2007/03/07 · No Comments

I know it sounds awful in this day and age to be using slaves but Logochips don’t really mind that much. There are a couple of groups that are considering multiple Logochips and here is a suggestion of how that can be done.  You can do something really easy by using the built in serial comm ports (portc 6 and portc 7). Here’s a brief schematic.

                                Schem

The program that goes in the master is slightly different than the program in the slaves in that the slaves have to keep their mouths shout until spoken to by the master otherwise the master won’t know which slave is doing the talking. So here’s the Logochip software programs.

   Master:    Master1                   Slave: Slave1 

 TextPage        TextPage

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PWM variable control of lights and motors

2007/02/24 · No Comments

Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) as it is used in electronics is the greatest thing since sliced bread.

PWMschem 

What it allows us to do is regulate the flow of energy with out wasting so much of it. In the early days if you had a 12 volt battery and you wanted to drive a 6 volt lamp you could use a transistor to regulate the voltage down to 6 volts but half of the energy was wasted as heat in the transistor. PWM uses the adveatage of time. A 6 volt light buld or a motor or many other devices can actually run at 12 volts just not for a long time. So we take advantage of that by pulsing. For instance, having the lamp on for 1/2 of a second and then off for 1/2 of a second would be like delivering 6 volts for one second. Of course you could call that blinking but if you speed that up about 100 times and do it at a frequency of 100 Hertz it’s so fast you can’t see the blink. Whats more the filiment of the light buld doesn’t have time to heat up to the 12 volt level so it dosen’t know the difference eather. It thinks its running at 6 volts. Caution – results may vary depending on the type of lamp your using but negative effects can be reduced by adjusting frequency and duty cycle (on and off time).

What about the transistor? Yes there is still a transistor involved but idealy it is working just like a switch. When it’s off there is no current flow and no power lost. And when it’s on all the current goes through it to the lamp and none is lost in the transistor (switch).

Here are some cleaver links I found that might help.

http://www.cpemma.co.uk/pwm.html

http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/circ/pwm555.html

http://www.acroname.com/robotics/info/concepts/pwm.html

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Capacitive Proximity Sensing

2007/02/23 · No Comments

      Here’s a neat magic trick for a user interface. It’s called capacitive proximity sensing. It can detect the presence of a finger or a hand or a body on the opposite side of a wall. This can be really handy when you want the observer to interact with something but have the interface be completely invisible.

ProximityMagic     

     The technique involves three parts: One, an oscillator circuit that uses a metal plate as the capacitor that effects the frequency. Two, a frequency divider that averages out all the garbage that might be picked up by the metal plate. and Three, a circuit that detects changes in the average frequency.

                                        Schem

 Here’s a rough schematic using a very simple circuit. In the schematic I have it lighting an LED but this could go into the Logochip or another circuit.

I have data sheets for the two Integrated Circuits used in the circuit here:

           the CD40106      and the CD4040

 

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Logochip Xylophone

2007/01/31 · No Comments

I’m getting the hang of some of this linking pictures and movies in blogs.

This is a Logochip driving a stepper motor and relay coil to play a xylophone.

xylophone1.jpg

Here’s the Logochip code that I showed you in class.

And a schematic of the drive circuit and motor.

And just for kicks watch the  video .

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LCD Display

2007/01/28 · No Comments

Well that was a challange. John gave one of the WD_C2401P LCD modules to me and I played with it till I got it to work.

WD-C2401P

Here’s the new code:
to startup
 write porta-ddr 0
 write portb-ddr 0
 cc $1C cc $14 cc $28 cc $4f cc $60 cc 1
 dd 32 dd 32 dd 32
 dd 72 dd 101 dd 108 dd 108 dd 111 ;Hello
 dd 32
 dd 87 dd 111 dd 114 dd 108 dd 100  ;World
end

to cc :x x   ;send a command
 clearbit 2 $f89    ;clear RS to write commands
 write portb :x x
 setbit 3 $f89      ;clock the command in
 mwait 2
 clearbit 3 $f89
 wait 1
end

to dd :x x  ;send character data
 setbit 2 $f89     ;set RS to write data
 write portb :x x
 setbit 3 $f89   ;clock the data in
 mwait 2
 clearbit 3 $f89
end

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LCD Hello world!

2007/01/25 · No Comments

Welcome to CRATEL blogs. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Well I must say it’s good to be here… Where am I?

This may be jumping the gun a little bit but I hooked up an LCD module and got it working. Here’s the logochip program. Here’s a picture and a schematic.

LCD Mod1     Schem

Here’s the Logochip program: 

;——————————————- 

to startup
 write porta-ddr 0
 write portb-ddr 0
 cc $80 cc $38 cc $0C cc $40 cc $01
 dd 32 dd 32 dd 32
 dd 72 dd 101 dd 108 dd 108 dd 111 ;Hello
 dd 32
 dd 87 dd 111 dd 114 dd 108 dd 100  ;World
end

to cc :x x   ;send a command
 clearbit 2 $f89    ;clear RS to write commands
 write portb :x x
 setbit 3 $f89      ;clock the command in
 mwait 2
 clearbit 3 $f89
 mwait 300
end

to dd :x x  ;send character data
 setbit 2 $f89     ;set RS to write data
 write portb :x x
 clearbit 3 $f89   ;clock the data in
 mwait 2
 setbit 3 $f89
 print :x x
end

;—————————————

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