Archive for the 'Halloween Arduino' Category
Zech Frost
Well my inspriation for my dead baby in a coffin came to me one night after a few beers at the local spot. My daughter was not exactly happy with this project though…

Specification

  • 2 White leds
  • 2 5mm led holders
  • 1 160 ohm resistor
  • 1 Servo
  • 1 Bread board
  • 1 6.3V External power source used to power the servos in my nitro truck
  • 1 Linkage rod from my carburator on my Savage 4.6
  • Wiring
  • 1 Zip tie
  • Hot glue
  • Cut up pillow case
  • 1 Black rattle can
  • 1/4″ Plywood 
  • 2 hinges
  • Velcro
  • Heat activated shrink wrap

Description

  • I made the coffin out of some scrap plywood I had laying around the garage. It is 14″ long 4 1/2″ tall. The base starts out at 4″ wide and peaks out to 6″ then back to 4″ at the head then spray painted the coffin. I used a babies head from one of my daughters dolls. I popped the eyes out of the babies head and drill holes for the led holders to fit into the head. I wired and soldered the led wires. I used the heat activated shrink wrap to cover the solder and the bare wires. The led that I ran from pin 12 on the Arduino I included a 160 ohm resistor that way the 6v power source would not blow the led. Pin 13 has a resister built into the Arduino board from the factory so I did not put a resistor on this led. The servo motor I hooked up to the 5v constant and ran the signal wire off of pin 9 on the Arduino board. I used the bread board as a grounding tool and ran all the grounds to it and then grounded them to the Arduino. The blink program came from the Arduino website. The servo motor program came from someone on the internet Thank You whoever you are! It was days later and I could not find the right website in my history to correctly reference it. After everything was wired up I hot glued the babies head to the bottom of the coffin. I took the velcro and used it to keep the power supply and bread board from moving around inside the coffin. To mount the servo I just globbed hot glue all over the bottom and stuck it to the side of the coffin where I needed it to funtion how I wanted it to. I hooked the throttle linkage to the servo and used it as my prop rod to open the coffin lid. After I got everything working properly I cut down an old pillow case that I had and hot glued it into the coffin to hide the electronics. Bring a spoon!

#include <Servo.h>   Servo myservo;                  int pos = 90;   int led = 13; int led1 = 12; void setup() {   myservo.attach(9);   pinMode(led, OUTPUT);   pinMode(led1, OUTPUT); }     void loop() {   for(pos = 0; pos < 0; pos += 1)     {                                       myservo.write(pos);                   delay(30);                          }

{     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led, LOW);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);     delay(100);     digitalWrite(led1, LOW);     delay(100);       for(pos = 90; pos>=0; pos-=1)       {                                    myservo.write(pos);                   delay(20);                         }     } }

Reflection

  • To make this project even more awsome I think hooking up a speaker with some kind of scary baby sounds would have been good! also I would have hid the servo better.
  • Well for starters I would definitely have this project done on time. shrug (life) I think I would also have used red leds instead of white. Also I would have incorporated using the photo sensor.
  • Even though it can be a pain to work in groups with everyones schedule it sure can be beneficial when you have many time constraints of your own.
  • I would really suggest that if you want to use one of your daughters old dolls that you do not let them observe you removing the head from the doll it might be a tramatic experience that they do not let you forget about…
Justin Hall
My Arduino project was to compile an LED blinking mechanism on to my foam project Spooky Tree.  Honestly, I chose what I thought would be simple, logical, and efficient.  What I encountered was a relentless assault of intricate annoyances and convoluted labor.

Specification

  • MAIN SPEC: Ability to dissemble easily and sustain the electrical properties.
  • Able to light 12 series of 2 LED systems in a predefined pattern.
  • Able to be built from specifications of an alpha project.
  • Adheres to the generality of “Halloween.”

Description

  • The Spooky Tree features 24 LEDs (8 red, 8 yellow, and 8 white) that are to light in a pattern defined in Arduino.
  • Physical picture provided.
  • Picture
  • This project is easily able to be duplicated with tedious wiring, the Inkscape for the tree, and the Arduino code.

Reflection

  • If I had any real concept of what it would take to perform these remedial, T1 tasks, I would have allocated more time.  Around 27 man hours were put into getting to this (most likely incomplete) state.
  • I learned how to solder in this project, which is a vital tool.

spookytreearduino

Ryan Chakron undead baby head.
This project is a baby head attached to a “stake”. It is meant for, whenever someone walks by, it moves the head back and forth, as if to look around. I got the motivation because my mom has a candy bowl that has a hand that goes down whenever someone reaches their hand inside, so I tried to do something like that.

Specification

  • Baby Head
  • “Stake” (something to hold the baby to the servo)
  • Servo
  • Photoresistor light sensor
  • Candy bowl

Description

The baby is meant to look around with lit red eyes, as if too look around. It is supposed to be an “undead” baby, it’s head ripped off but attached to a pole. The wiring consists of two LEDs, a servo, and a photoresistor. It is meant for whenever the photoresistor sensor reaches a certain threshold of darkness, the baby’s head looks around.  The baby is connected by a pipe to the servo. I used a pipe to connect the baby to the servo so that I could put the wires through the pipe and into the babies head so that I could hide the wires. The two LEDs act as glowing red eyes, as to add to the “horror”. The photoresistor sticks almost flush to the bowl so that it is a little hidden, but able to get light to know when not to activate the baby head. It is covered by a lid so that you cannot see all the wires.

On the Servo, it is connected to the 9 outlet, ground, and 5v power. The two LEDs are connected to the arduino with a resistor and are always on, and the photoresistor is connected to the Analog (A0) outlet and ground.

 

 

Coding: Halloween_Arduino

Reflection

  • Q: How could your project be even more awesome?
  • A: Have the baby screaming or crying whenever it turned on so that it would be more horrific 
  • Q: What would you do differently?
  • A: Nothing different, just add the screaming.
  • Q: Anything specific you learned while doing the project that you want to share?
  • A: Don’t wait for the last minute to do the project, it will not work out.
  • Other comments?
Josh Hunt Halloween Arduino

For me the the first thing that comes to mind when I think of Halloween is a mixture of skeletons, zombies, vampires, etc. accompanied with some violence or gore. My project combines these two elements to create an axe wielding skeleton.

 

Specification

  • Foam Skeleton 18 inches tall
  • Foam Axe/Arm (arm is 5 inches long, axe is 6 inches long)
  • 2 Red Leds
  • 2 Green Leds
  • 1 Button (to turn it on)
  • 1 Servo

Description

  • My skeleton upon pressing of the button the two red leds or the “eyes” light up and fade in and out, the two green leds in the contained in the mouth cutout of the skeleton stay on and the axe/arm go up and down. It will complete one cycle upon a press of a button, and the button must be held for continuous action.
  • skeleton – arduino file.. all code was taken from either the arduino website except for the code for the servo which came from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8BmFfl-u0c. I then modified/combined the code to obtain the desired outcome. 
  • To produce this project I first used InkScape to design a skeleton and axe which I then used in conjunction with a foam cutting machine to obtain the cutout version of my skeleton. I then went and found the code for the following: LED being constantly lit, a blinking LED, servo, and a button to operate it all. Then after a bit of experimenting and tweaking I got all of these functions to work together. One of the most important things I found out along the way is that you MUST have a resistor attached to your button, or sometimes instead of doing the intended function the LED’s will just blink and the servo does something a little quirky. Finally I attached the LED’s and servo to the skeleton, and then attached the foam axe to the servo. The button along with all of the other wires are connected to a bread board. Upon a press of the button the device activates! Enjoy!

Reflection

  • Maybe it could have been more awesome if I had two servos instead of one, for dual action axe chopping!
  • If I did this project again, I would have made it so that it could stand freely without relying on me holding it up.
  • Another problem I had is that the neck and spine were too fragile after connecting everything and they broke. As a result it broke in these two spots which I then fixed with some tape. So once again, needed more support.
Carol Viluethpad
Awake Nosferatu!
This project is an homage to the first vampire movie EVER/I saw this lovely silent film a couple weekends ago. I was inspired by the many scenes where Nosferatu seems to just magically appear and decided it would be fun to try and imitate that through foam. Except it’s a little less “magically appear,” and a little more “there.” I wanted to pay special attention to the lighting (the LEDs) which the film was highly praised for. 
 
Specification
  • 12″ x 10″ x 8.25″
  • Switch activates/deactivates LEDs 
  • Switch is manually powered
  • LEDs perform different actions – blink separately
  • Stands alone

Description

  • Essentially, it is a recreation of the scene where Nosferatu is recognized as a “strange new passenger”/stowaway in the hull of the ship as it travels back to Hutter (the protagonist–real-estate agent of sorts). Coffins of dirt were filled and stored on the ship, however one coffin contained Count Orlak (Nosferatu), so that he could travel by day and avoid the sun. Ergo, this particular Arduino project is best displayed in a dark area. The LEDs provide backlighting for Nosferatu in attempt to communicate an “ominous” aura about him. 
  • Wiring Diagram: (See image below and right)

Design the coffins in which Nosferatu will “arise” from using InkScape (approximately 2.75″ x 8″)
Option: Paint/color the foam before assembling. Make it unique!  But if you want it to be traditional then stick with your plain rectangular prism. 
Using the bread board wire up a switch and two LEDs together
Write the code to program the switch to control the LEDs and the speed at which they blink in the Arduino program
Be as random and wonky as you want. Be creative! 
Assemble! Create your various stack of coffins as you wish–whether you want to hide wires or just leave them out in the open. 
Don’t forget to create a Nosferatu of your own: 
Doodle a vampire. You can be as scary or as fun (or even both) as you would like! Just have fun with it. :] 
Create a right triangle of foam (preferably from your excess foam) to create a stand for your Nosferatu in the coffin
The angle at which your hypotenuse lies determines the angle Nosferatu will “rise” (or stay forever in the process of rising) 
 
 

Reflection

  • How could your project be even more awesome? I would add color and focus more on the aesthetics to actually make it more pleasing to the eye. Like adding felt “dirt” and rats just like the film. Possibly even the addition of a MeMotor to actually make Nosferatu rise from the coffin.
  • What would you do differently? I would definitely start on this project earlier so that I do have more time for little aesthetic details and such. 
  • Anything specific you learned while doing the project that you want to share? I am so glad I took a programming class in high school. Also, I think I have a greater appreciation for the film, Nosferatu.
  • Other comments? If you spend some time with them, Arduinos can do some pretty cool things. 
Halloween Arduino Project
For my project I used an old halloween mask to ligt up from the inside using the LED lights to fade in and out also with potentiometer. 

Specification

  • Whole thing is 12 inched tall.
  • 5.5 inches wide
  • I used two leds
  • A potentiometer 
  • A foam head to help keep the mask up.

Description

  • I wired up some LEDs to the arduino to flash and fade with the arduino, Each LED should sit at each eye as if they were glowing. I have the potentiometer  in place so i can mess with it manually if wanted.
    Used Mask

    Project mask

  •  Include here a diagram showing your wiring. Draw a schematic if you can. A cell phone pic of a hand drawing is fine.
  • Halloween_project

Reflection

  • I wanted to to make the bat and the mouth move, along with a speaker making noise but I couldn’t do it in the amount of time needed.
  • Hope for more time!
  • Just useful info about electricity in general.
Camron Spelts

For my Halloween project I decided to make a gypsy ball that light up with different colors and also plays a little tune. I even took an old bag i had and used it for decoration of the Gypsy Ball

Specification

  • 3-1/4” clear glass globe
  • Two 220 ohm resistors and three 120 ohm resistors
  • Small 8 ohm speaker
  • 5”x5”x1” box
  • 12”x12” cloth
  • 5 LEDs (blue,white,green,red,yellow)

Description

  • when given power the gypsy ball plays a tune from the speaker. Then after it plays it, the different colored  LEDs  light up one after the other then it goes back through the loop playing the tune again. I also put a potentiometer to control the volume of the speaker.
  • GP_BALL

Reflection

  • I would have like to make it motion activated so that when someone walks by it would activate
  • If I could do it a different way to where the LEDs fade and a servo will move the LEDs, but I like the way it goes through all the LEDs
  • Learned a lot about programming though I did have a bit of trouble with it
F_B1 Tyson Tompkins
The projects name in F_B1 (advanced prototype).  After years of exhausting experimenting, we have developed an advanced prototype Frankenstein, F_B1 (Franken Baby.)  F_B1 eyes light up and arms move up and down, which are all controlled by a photo-resistor in his foot.  I assembled F_B1 because of the enjoyment my kids have with Halloween props and it is probably the only animatronic creature we do not own.

 

 

F_B1 Specifications

    1)  Stands  from head to toes, 11″

   2) His waist line is 7.5″

   3)  Reach of 3″

   4) Legs have a length of 4.75″

   5)  Diameter of head is 8.75″ for extra mental capacity.

In short he is the perfect size being to access anything and loved by everyone.

 

Advanced Prototype Description

  • I took a typical small plastic baby  and removed all the limbs and head from the torso.
  • Removed 1.25″ off the top of the head piece.  Giving me access to the eye sockets.
  • Removed both eyes and disassembled the sockets including the plastic retina in the front of the eyeball.
  • Drilled holes through back of  eyeballs in order to remove the counter weights with an exacto knife, then scrapping the color from the retinas. 
  • Super glued the eyes open then hot glued the new reconditioned eyeballs back into the socket.
  • Soldered two green LEDs onto a small piece of circuit board, (2.25″ * 5/8″), soldering the LEDs to two 330 amp axial-lead resistors.
  • F_B1 arms move up and down a total of 90 degrees. His arms are driven by a small servo inside of his body cavity which is attached to a large straighten paper clip, (2.25″ long), hooked to a rod connected to both shoulders.
  • The shoulder rod is bent down both arm shafts then hot glued excessively.
  • Drilled a 1/4″ hole in Left foot. Installing two small 9″ insulated wires, soldered to the photocell, up the left leg then out F_B1 back side.
  • All wires are fed through the rear opening of F_B1 and attach to the Arduino.  
  • Servo is attached to pin 9
  • LEDs are attached to Analog pin 6
  • Photo Cell is attached to pin 12

Parts List:

Small plastic baby, 1 small servo, small steel rod, two green LED bulbs, 2 foot of insulated wire (small gauge), 1 photocell resistor, 2 330 amp resistors, 1 pc. 3″/3.75″ curcit board, hot glue, soldering iron and solder, small amounts of electrical tape, exacto knife, two #6/2″ bolts with 4 washers and 2 nuts, 2 bushings using 1/4 aluminum tubing, Arduino Uno, Super glue.

Function Description:

F_B1 has the ability to move his arms 90 degrees up and down while his eyes flash on and off.  These movement are turned on by a photocell placed into his left foot. 

Schematics for F_B1: 

 

 

int led = 6; int lightPin = 0; int threshold = 250;

#include <Servo.h>   Servo myservo;  // create servo object to control a servo                 // a maximum of eight servo objects can be created   int pos = 0;    // variable to store the servo position   void setup() {   Serial.begin(9600);   myservo.attach(9);  // attaches the servo on pin 9 to the servo object   pinMode(led,OUTPUT); }     void loop() {   Serial.println(analogRead(lightPin));   if (analogRead(lightPin) > threshold);   analogWrite(led,0);   for(pos = 0; pos < 90; pos += 2)  // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees   {                                  // in steps of 1 degree     myservo.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable ‘pos’     delay(50);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position   }   for(pos = 90; pos>=1; pos-=2){     // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees     myservo.write(pos);              // tell servo to go to position in variable ‘pos’     analogWrite(led,10);     delay(50);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position     analogWrite(led,0);     delay(50);                       // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position   } }

 

If I was to do the F_B1 again:

I would have engineered a more secure shoulder attachment inside the shoulder cavity.  Other than that it went together fairly smoothly.   Programing was the most difficult part of the project.

The project would have been more successful if I could have accompanied F_B1 with a video showing the arrival of the advanced prototype and the surgeons who assembled him.  But it is soon to come.

A larger baby would have made the project less complicated, mainly for assembly.

F_B1 The movie

 

 

Dakota Handke
I made a “haunted” whispering Jack-o-Lantern dragster.

Specification

  • It is approximately 2ft long.
  • 2ft high.
  • and can go at a slow crawl on medium length carpet.
  • with a scare-fully cheerful tune that is 5 seconds long, looping indefinitely.
  • while looping two leds blink alternatively at 5 blinks a second.

Description

  • When the 9V battery is connected, the motor starts, and the “scary” plays as the leds blink, going in a circle for convenience. All the hardware exept motor is in the pumpkin decoration to hide the evil Arduino mastermind.
  • try3
  • With a salvaged erector set dragster. I mutilated the motor wires to be compatible to the arduino. I drilled three holes in the bottom of the Jack-o-lantern i used one set of nut and bolt to  have an anchor, another hole could be done the same way if you wish. the last hole is for the motor wire to be accessible to the arduino inside. I used duct tape to cover the hardware. I made a slit in the duct tape so the battery connector is easely accessible. 

Reflection

  • How could your project be even more awesome? Well I could just have the jack-o-lantern be the main body with a better speaker.
  • What would you do differently? same as above.
  • Anything specific you learned while doing the project that you want to share? I learned sottering, and programming a speaker.