Archive for the 'Halloween Arduino' Category
Haunted House- Nicholas McNeil & Mosha Godlisen
 

Haunted House – Nicholas McNeil & Mosha Godlisen

Our arduino project is a haunted house the consists of two ghost pooping up through the windows with flashing leds.

Specification

  • Dimensions of House
    • Height- 11 in
    • width- 11 in
    • depth-14 in
  • Servo rotation degrees ( 30 degrees to 180 degrees)
  • Led flash time (.5 sec on .1 sec off) 
  • 1 arduino
  • 1 breadboard
  • 1 servo
  • 2 blue and 2 red leds
  • assorted foam cutouts
  • wiring
  • 4 resistors
  • webbing

 

Description

  • Our project utilizes a servo to rotate foam cut outs of ghosts to pop out into the upper windows of our haunted house. The loop function that controls our servo also controls the leds ( eyes of the ghosts) to flash once the appeared in the windows.
  • Below is a schematic of the wiring.

 Front View of the Haunted House

Internals of The Haunted House 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Below is the Code to program the arduino

#include <Servo.h>

Servo myservo;

int pos = 50; 

int led = 13;

 int led1 = 12;

 int led2 = 11;

int led3 = 7;

void setup()

 {

myservo.attach(9);

pinMode(led, OUTPUT);

pinMode(led1, OUTPUT);

pinMode(led2, OUTPUT);

pinMode(led3, OUTPUT);

}

   void loop()

 {

for(pos = 30; pos < 180; pos += 1)

 {

 myservo.write(pos);

delay(7);

 }

 {  

digitalWrite(led, HIGH);

delay(500);

digitalWrite(led, LOW);

delay(100);   

digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);

delay(500);

digitalWrite(led1, LOW);

delay(100);

digitalWrite(led2, HIGH);

delay(500);

digitalWrite(led2, LOW);

delay(100);

digitalWrite(led3, HIGH);

delay(500);

digitalWrite(led3, LOW);

delay(100);

}

  for(pos = 30; pos>=1; pos-=1)

 {

myservo.write(pos); 

delay(7);  

}

 }

 

 

Reflection

  • Our project could of been more awesome if we had a ghost pop out through the door, or added more leds, or just improve the aesthetics(scariness) of the house itself.
  • Differently, I would or redesigned the house.
  • Overall, the project went fairly smooth and does exactly what we intended it to do.
This Is Halloween–Rueben and JD
We decided to build an homage to Tim Burton’s “The Nightmare Before Christmas” using LEDs, a servo, foam, and a speaker.  Nothing screams Halloween more than a Tim Burton film.

Specification

  • 1 Arduino
  • 1 breadboard
  • Multiple wires
  • 2 LEDs
  • 1 servo
  • 1 paper plate
  • Assorted foam pieces
  • Artificial spider webbing

Description

  • Our project executes multiple functions.  A sign waves, LEDs flash, and a tune plays via a speaker. 
  • We actually didn’t draw out our wiring; we just started plugging things in.  My initial design for the speaker circuit was taken from the Spark Fun Guide entry for the Buzzer project.  
  • This Is Halloween! (Arduino INO code)

Reflection

  • How could your project be even more awesome?

             There is always more we could have done.  We had several ideas that did not come to fruition due to time constraints.  After seeing other projects, I think we could’ve made the tune more epic.  We could have also used a sensor to make the whole apparatus operate based on ambient light.

  • What would you do differently?

            I think if we had it to do again, we’d make it a bit less complicated.  I don’t think we realized how much coding would go into making the whole thing run on one Arduino.  Thankfully, Dom bailed us out on that one.  

  • Anything specific you learned while doing the project that you want to share?

            As someone who is really interested in music, I thought programming the Arduino to play a tune was cool.  I’ve used MIDI controllers and such on a computer, but this gave me an idea of the inner workings of those controllers. 

Half-lifeWeen Arduino
Daniel Hughes
Dylan Shank

Daniel built the gravity gun for his foam project, and we wanted to use it and make it light up, and make the arms move, so it was more similar to the one in game.

Specification

  • 20 led lights in parallel chains of 5.
  • 3 servos
  • 1 button
  • 36 inch length
  • 24 inch width

Description

  • lights on the top bottom left and right of the barrel of the gravity gun glow with a candle flicker, and servos hold the claws at the end of the gun in place, once the button in the trigger area is pressed, the claws clamp down and the lights glow at 100%.
  • 20131030_101638 video!
  • arduino_Gravity_Gun
  • final gravity gun model combined
 
  • Reflection
  • The flicker programming has a delay in it, so you have to push the button for a second sometimes before it engages, I would’ve liked to have made that more prompt.
  • I broke out my aperture science logos. . . I would’ve not done that. I also would’ve made the claws a little more 3 dimensional.
  • I learned a ton about programming! 
Halloween Arduino: Eduardo Moran & Corey Bell
Halloween Arduino: The Crazy Skull
Eduardo Moran: Programmer 
Corey Bell: Hardware Designer
 
 
The design of the skull came to mind when Rye first introduced this project. Simple design of a chattering skull with LED’s for eyes. The decision on how the skull would actually work was open ended, so the final choice was that when the lights were off the skull would function. 
 
The Specifications:
  • Photoresitor: Measures the amount of light there was in the room
  • Cervo: Degree of the movement the skull had
  • Skull: 
    • Foam cut out from Inkscape
    • Sharpie outlines/designs
  • Wood Planks: 2×4 cut out for support for the Curvo, Breadboard/Circuit
  • Wood Rode: 0.5 Diameter/4 inches length: Attached to Cervo to assist the skull’s movements 
  • Circuit: Jumper Wires, Resisotrs, Breadboard, Arduino, Photoresistor, LEDs, Cervo & USB cord
Description/Reflection:
The hardware of the project came out as planned, not much problem hooking it all up making sure the ascetics were good. But when it came to the programming, this was a whole different story due to the fact that both my partner and I were noobs in the programming world. Making the photoresistor the actual “on-off” switch, and having the loop function correct was the most difficult part. But when it came down to it I learned that programming was basic logic. “These are the things we have hooked up. If this, then that. If not this, then this.” After the program was put together and fixing all the troubleshooting was corrected the skull was functioning correctly. We had a angry looking skull when the lights went off. 
 
Arduino Code: 
Skull Cut Out:
The not-so-iron mask

our project

.

Our project is a Halloween version of the ironman mask. Everyone wants to have the coolest costume and what would be better than a functioning iron man mask. And what would be more interactive than a mask that you wear.

Specification

  • Offer at least 5 specific measurable things about your Halloween Arduino project
  • use of two 9v batteries
  • max width: 7.5″
  • max height: 7″
  • gear ratio: 16:1 ?
  • about 2 second opening time for mask

Description

 Team Jobs

Kyle: mask construction and shaping  and LED wiring

Will: H-Bridge construction and motor and gear operation

  • the mask  is made up of cardboard, plactic safety glasses, hot glue, mesh tape, LED lights, motor, and multiple kinds of wire. the mask opens up about three inches and closes the same with the push of one of two buttons. The way to make the motor be able to switch directions was made able by the use of a H-Bridge. A H-Bridge The H-Bridge is a circuit which can drive a DC motor in forward and reverse. The motor direction is changed by switching the polarity of the voltage in order to turn the motor one way or the other. This is easily demonstrated by applying a 9-volt battery to the leads of a small motor and then switching the terminals to change directions. The H-Bridge is given it’s name based on the basic circuit which demonstrates it’s operation.
    The circuit consists of four switches which complete the circuit when applied in pairs. When switches S1 and S4 are closed the motor gets power and spins. When S2 and S3 are closed the motor gets power and spins in the other direction. Note that S1 and S2 or S3 and S4 should never be closed together in order to avoid a short circuit. Obviously physical switches are impractical since no one is going sit there flipping switches in pairs to get their robot to move forward or in reverse. That’s where the transistors comes in. A transistor acts as a solid state switch that closes when a small current is applied to it’s base. Because only a small current is required to activate a transistor we are able to complete one half of the circuit with a single signal.
  • The LEDs are glued on the outside of safety class lenses and has a fish net covering. You are even able to see out of the eyes with the LEDs on. There is also an LED attached on the bottom of the chin to give the mask a glowing effect.
  • Include here a diagram showing your wiring. Draw a schematic if you can. A cell phone pic of a hand drawing is fine.
  • Give at least 1 picture of your project. If you can, provide a short video as well.
  • Include your arduino code (ino file) as an attachment.
  • Make sure somebody could completely duplicate your results based on your description.

Reflection

  • How could your project be even more awesome?
  • our project could have been more awesome in many ways. first, the mask was not quite big enough to be able to wear on your head, so that was a downer. Second, the it would have been awesome to be able to attach the opening mechanism to the outside of the helmet rather than on the inside. 
  • What would you do differently?
  • Being able to laser cut out gears for the sides to open the mask, add more led lights to the glasses, make the mask bigger to be able to be worn, smooth out the connection points of the mask to helmet, and mount the bread boards in some way or fashion.
  • Anything specific you learned while doing the project that you want to share?
  • Helps to know your limitations on the project. We didn’t use much programming at all, because for what we wanted to accomplish, adruino programming was not the tool to use, though we tried many times.
  • Other comments?
Ben and Michael Halloween Arduino Project

Halloween Music Box

Michael: Programmer

Ben: Hardware builder

 

The project that we built is a music box that lights up and dispenses candy. The pumpkin plays a very spooky tune that resembles that of “Lavender Town” from Pokemon R/B/Y. The song is in full with chords and a repeat at the end of the sequence. Both of our Arduinos are connected so that we can use the extra timmer and have all 3 speakers playing in unison to bring you the chord progression that the song requires. We have 4 yellow LED lights and 1 red LED that shine inside of the pumpkin to give it more of an ominous glow. The song is also triggered by a small button that is inside of the pumpkin on the breadboard.

Specs:

1 8″x7 1/2″ plastic pumpkin

2 Arduinos

Lots of wires

7 resistors

3 speakers

5 LEDs (4 yellow, 1 red)

2 breadboards

1 Arduino USB cord

1 button

Duct Tape

cardboard base

Styrofoam bowl

And last but not least… Candy

 

The code that was used for the song:

Tone_Michael

 

 

The entire song had to be composed which consists of 4 intro measures along with a 20 measure melody that repeats at the end to form a grand total of 44 measures and an approximate song length of 1 minute and 29 seconds.

 

 

The finished product:

Candy!!

The belly of the beast…

 

 

Reflection: We wanted to make some kind of spooky looking pumpkin with lots of lights in it to start. We then added the music aspect to our project which turned out to be a huge undertaking. The troubleshooting involved with just trying to get 3 speakers to play at the same time could have easily taken up 10+ hours of work. But in the end we got the speakers all to work with the help of Rye and Dominique.  The actual composing of the song had to be done to find out which frequencies each note had and to count each beat as individual. The longest part had to of been figuring out which note goes where and when, which took a very long time to write into code. But overall we got the project done and got the song playing very nicely. 

Micheal Moore and Nathan Nixon :Skeleton in a coffin

Skeleton in a coffin

Michael Moore: Programmer, builder

Nathan Nixon: Planning, mechanics builder

Our Ardiuno project is a skeleton popping out of a coffin. This is done with a light sensor, when you get close, the skeleton will pop out. The skeleton has LED eyes, and a servo is what does the actual action of moving the skeleton.

Specs:

The coffin: 7’’ by 5’’ by 2’’ coffin

Rotating mechanism: ½’’ by 21/2’’

Skeleton on a pop sickle stick: 1’’ by 5’’

Case cover: 6’’ by 4’’ cover

Stand: Stand to raise servo 1’’ by 1’’ by 2mm cube

Reflection: The hardest part was figuring out the programming part for the actual mechanics, once that was figured out, it was smooth. Another dilemma was finding wires small enough to fit concealed underneath the skeleton. The actual building was easy, and once the code was figured out, the project was simple.

Programming:

#include <Servo.h>

Servo myservo;  // create servo object to control a servo

int pos = 90;    // variable to store the servo position

int led1 = 13;  // LED connected to digital pin 13 (green eye)

int led2 = 12; //  LED connected to digital pin 12 (yellow eye)

int photovalue;

int photopin = A2;

void setup()

{

  Serial.begin(9600);  // initialize serial communication at 9600 bits per second:

  myservo.attach(9);  // attaches the servo on pin 9 to the servo object

  pinMode(photopin, INPUT);

  pinMode(led1, OUTPUT); // LED

  pinMode(led2, OUTPUT); // LED

 }

void loop()

{

  int photovalue = analogRead(photopin); // read the input on analog pin A1:

  Serial.println(photovalue);  // print out the value you read:

 if( photovalue >= 600)  //  start actions if photocell value is greater than 600

  {                                

    myservo.write(0);              // tell servo to go to position 180 degrees

    delay(800); 

      }

else

{                               

    myservo.write(90);              // tell servo to go to position 90 degrees

    delay(400);                       // waits 400ms for the servo to reach the position

    led1_2on_off();  // start led functions

    }

  }  //loop ending

void led1_2on_off()

{

  digitalWrite(led1, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)

  delay(50);                  // wait for a 50 milli seconds

  digitalWrite(led1, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW

  delay(50);                 // wait for 50 milli seconds

  digitalWrite(led2, HIGH); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)

  delay(50);                 // wait for 50 mili seconds

  digitalWrite(led2, LOW);   // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW

  delay(50);                 // wait for 50 milli seconds

}

 

Halloween Arduino- Steven, Jacob

We designed a scary pumpkin that has glows by a “fire” that turns on when it gets dark, and a servo rotating to hide or show the light. 

 

Specifications
LED .1-.2V
Turn on Photoresistor<100
Servo 6 secs for full cycle
Servo rotation 180 degrees
Servo 4.9V

When Photoresistor goes under 100 (we measured from serial monitor) the arduino powers on. The 2 yellow and 1 red LEDs are turned on, and they are blinking in a random fashion to imitate fire. The servo runs simultaneously with a piece of foam attached to hide or show the light. The whole thing will stop once the room lights are flipped back on. We  used a medium-sized, carved pumpkin to place the main breadboard in, and had the arduino and the photoresistor on the outside of the pumpkin.  

Diagram-

It was fun to connect the intangible code to something that would interact with environment.

 Code: halloween arduino

Reflection

  • Our project could be more awesome with sound effects and more lights in the pumpkin.
  • If we were to do anything differently, it would probably be to use more LEDs to make our “fire” brighter and possibly to add sound effects to the project. Also, not using the bread board would probably be an advantage since the connections would be more reliable.
  • We learned how to use the servos, LEDs and the photo resistor all in the same code. We did have trouble with it at first, but it came together in the end to make our project.
Halloween Arduino Kevin and Braden MW 10:30(FINAL)
We decided to do a halloween mask with 2 LED’s, one as each eye, and a servo to make the jaw move up and down. It is held up by a stick, kind of like a masquerade mask. Our mask can be put in action by simply stepping on a pressure plate that initiates the LEDs to start vigorously blinking and the jaw to start moving.
 

Specifications

  • 2x 10″ x 10″ foam masks
  • 2x aluminum plates accompanied by 2 5in x 5in foam squares
  • 10″ x 2″ foam jaw 
  • Blink vigorously(3-4 times/second)
  •  2″x2″x 8″ bass wood rod
  • 2x 2″ springs with r ~1/2″
  • 5″ spring with r ~1/2″
  • 4.5K ohm resistors
  • 2x red LEDs
  • 2x steel plates r~1″
  • long wire( ~8′)

Description

Our halloween mask is mainly comprised of 2 LED’s, an arduino, 1 servo, 2 foam masks, and a pressure plate. 

  • The product utilizes 1 servo and 2 LEDs. Because all of the components need to return back to ground, all of the components are attached to the foot pedal/pressure plate.

Instructions

  1. Make two masks on inkscape
  2. Cut out the masks using a CNC
  3. Collect all necessary components (such as wiring, soldering iron, LEDs, servo).
  4. Get some fencing wire and create your own springs using the lathe.
  5. Cut out 3 foam squares using a box cutter.
  6. Hot glue the plates to two of the foam squares.
  7. Get two paper clips, solder them to some very long wires(of your own choosing)
  8. Attach the paper clips to the foam squares and tape them on to ensure that they don’t fall off.
  9. Place the springs at the edge and hinge the other side of the square to make a “>” or “<”.
  10. Glue the other foam square if necessary(to hide any holes/spring parts)
  11. Upload the attached code to the arduino
  12. Tape/glue the arduino to the back of the front mask part.
  13. Get two random cuts of foam to rest the arduino on if taped.
  14. Wire the arduino with the LEDs on 13 and 12 and the servo on 9
  15. Attach the other wire to the ground from the foot pedal/ pressure plate
  16. Cut out 3 foam pieces, glue them together and place the servo on them.
  17. Attach the long spring so that it will consistently hit into the moving servo.
  18. Connect the two mask pieces using any size foam pieces you want(just note that the further from the jaw the better).
  19. Attach the other side of the spring to the jaw and hot glue if necessary.
  20. If necessary, add 2 or 3 pieces of foam on the top and bottom of the masks to give some support.
  21. If necessary, tape down wires so it is easier to manage.
 
 
 
 

Reflection

One way to make this project even more awesome would be to find out a way to make the jaw line up better and drop farther away from the face. If we were to do something different I think we should of took more time to find a way for the jaw to drop farther. This would of made it more interactive and fun. We learned that it took a lot more time than we first anticipated so we went toward a more simple route in the halloween mask. 

-Braden

  • I would have made the wires much shorter because the wires are a hassle to deal with
  • I would have made the jaw line up better and drop farther from the face as well
  • I would have implemented a multithreaded programming style if more time was allotted.
  • I would have used a speaker as well if additional time was allotted.
  • I would make the LEDs not in the middle of the eyes because you totally can’t see through it
  • I would have made the space between the masks as close as possible because it isn’t that pleasing to look at and its difficult to see through the eye pieces.
  • My building skills are god awful, so I would’ve had taken more time to ensure stability.
One of the things that nearly dumbfounded me was just how long it took to get everything to properly function correctly. It took us about 5 hours to get the basics out of the way to make a simple mask. The instructions and the pictures simply do not depict the amount of time and effort put into the project.
 
-Kevin

 

Code

#include <Servo.h>

Servo myservo;
Servo myservo2;

int pos = 0;
int led= 13;
int led2=12;
int ledState = LOW;
int ledState2 = LOW;
long interval = 5;
long interval2= 2;

void setup()
{
myservo.attach(9);
pinMode(led,OUTPUT);
pinMode(led2,OUTPUT);
}

void loop()
{

for(pos = 0; pos < 180; pos += 1)
{
unsigned long currentTime=millis();
if (currentTime % interval ==0)
{

if (ledState ==LOW)
{
ledState = HIGH;
}//ledState == low
else
{
ledState=LOW;
}//Else

}// If statement
if (currentTime % interval2 ==0)
{

if (ledState2 ==LOW)
{
ledState2 = HIGH;
}//ledState == low
else
{
ledState2=LOW;
}//Else

}// If statement

 

digitalWrite(led, ledState);
digitalWrite(led2, ledState2);

myservo.write(pos);
delay(5);
}
for(pos = 180; pos>=1; pos-=1)
{
unsigned long currentTime=millis();
if (currentTime % interval ==0)
{

if (ledState ==LOW)
{
ledState = HIGH;
}//ledState == low
else
{
ledState=LOW;
}//Else

}// If statement
if (currentTime % interval2 ==0)
{

if (ledState2 ==LOW)
{
ledState2 = HIGH;
}//ledState == low
else
{
ledState2=LOW;
}//Else

}// If statement

digitalWrite(led, ledState);
digitalWrite(led2, ledState2);

myservo.write(pos);
delay(5);
}
}

Night of the living Arduino ( Ryan Roth and Tate Robertson)
Our Decoration is a zombie hand coming out of the ground, searching for human flesh to devour. His tombstone lights up as he tries to escape from his grave. (Or he might have been a flashy dancer when he was alive, who knows) 

Specification

  • one base plate that is 8.5 in x 8.5 in 
  • one control base that is 8in x 8in 
  • four sides that are 4in x 8in 
  • one lid that is 8in x 8in 
  • on tombstone that is 9in tall and 5 in across
 

Description

  • The hand is operated by a servo. The servo is able to push the hand up and then bring it back down. 
  • We have two flashing  lights, one flashes and then the hand moves then the hand moves back and the other flashes. 
  • the lid comes off that way you can replace the batteries when you need to. 

or, our awesome Halloween project

Arduino for Grave of Doom

 

Reflection

  • If we had be able to acquire a plastic hand from a halloween shop like originally planned, I think that would have been a nice touch.
  • WE would have added some noise, and a plastic hand.
  • Time management is everything when it comes down to it. 
  • This project was a fun one. I just got a little 2spooky4me at times.