Archive for the 'Final Project' Category
Final Project Report – Team TopGear

Project Summary

Our project solved the problem of constantly needing to replace batteries in rc car remotes. We accomplished this by using our phone to control the arduino controlled 1972 chevelle. We based our work off numerous examples on instructables.

Team Members

Israel Taylor-Design/Construction

Chase Minor-Programmer

Project Design & Development

We first built the chassis for the car. Our ultimate goal was for weight to be as minimal as possible. The Chassis is constructed of cardboard and two metal rods that run through the cardboard. We then built the steering mechanism and attached the servo to control it. We then stole the gearbox, motor and wheels, from israel’s old RC car. Then we put 10 LEDs on the foam body. After installing all that we began to program the entire car system. We synced the bluetooth module to Chase’s phone and linked it through an app called BlueTerm. This allows for the forward, backwards, left, right, and stop commands able to be sent to the car. The car is very responsive and works very well.

 

Project Challenges & Insight

The main problems we encountered was getting Chase’s phone to conect to the arduino through bluetooth and the steering mechanism. For whatever reason the bluetooth would only link with certain apps. we had to switch the apps we used and in turn our entire code was switched. The steering was difficult to create a complex yet simple way to allow a servo to efficiently turn the wheels and still be able to support the cars weight.

Project Video

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Final Project Report – Team Piano

Project Summary

The goal was to build a miniature piano, the piano is going to be triggered by light sensors on the top. With the trigger of each sensor a different note is played; there are a total of ten notes (making a complete octave, plus 2). When each note is played, An LED corresponding to that note turns on. This set-up will be contained within a box to hide the wiring and increase the visual appeal of the piano. The project was based on previous work with the Arduino and speaker, as well as light sensor.

Team Members

Blake Jackson – Box design, Box assembly, Circuit Set-up

Mohammed Alyami –  Arduino Programming, Circuit Set-up

Dmitry Foster – Partial Box assembly, Post Master, Photoshop  Master

Project Design & Development

The essential features were the box containing the bread board with lights and light sensors, as well as another box with the arduino.

The box was designed by Blake without outside influence, and the code was written by Mohammed.

The testing phase was done before the creation of the box, it was found that the light sensors were too sensitive, it was modified with rubber tubing to help limit light registered by the sensor. No previous projects were used for the beginning of the project.

It was later decided to use a program that will allow the piano’s sound to be changed via a midi controller, the code for that was written by Mohammed with the help of Tom and Mr. Gridley. The team ended up abandoning the idea of LED’s corresponding to notes because there was limited room on the bread board.

Four of the sensors were built differently from the others; there were only 6 analog pins on the Arduino, therefore there needed to be 4 more digital pins as an input for the last 4 sensors, this requires the Midi circuit. In total there are 13 digital pins and 6 analog pins on the arduino.

Materials

  • 4 Lm358 chips 
  • 10 light sensors
  • 10 Resistors (10,000 Ω each)
  • 1 Arduino
  • 1 Midi Shield
  • 1 midi input to USB (Cable)
  • 2 Bread Boards
  • Plethora of wires

 

Project Challenges & Insights

Some of the biggest challenges of the project were the programming; writing the code for the arduino to play a sound when light is prevented from reaching the photo sensor as well as when the box was first made it  was too small for the arduino and bread board, it was later fixed. Another problem encountered was the sensitivity of the sensor, it was too sensitive, and eventually the team decided to add tubes to the sensors to filter light. Those were the largest challenges for the project. The construction of the box and finishing touches were relatively simple. The team believes that it did all that was possible and best in the construction of the project and wouldn’t change anything in the future. Another change was abandoning the LED’s for the notes.

Project Video

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 Also the code: Final_Project

Final Project Report – Team RAR

Project Summary

Our project is a traditional trebuchet with a modern twist. We added a little bit of technology to this ancient warfare technique. A servo attached to an arduino with a button is used to “pull the pin” and make the trebuchet fire at its target. Our project is based on work with the ardiuno, servo, and button that we have done in the past.

 

Team Members

Rachel S.- Cutting wood pieces for trebuchet, building base, drilling holes for throwing arm, making sling and firing pin

Rachel L.- Building base, and supports for trebuchet, making metal rods to hold throwing arm, blog post and movie, making sling and firing pin

Alex- Programing and building the servo and button to work with the arduino, adding arm to servo

Project Design & Development

We started our project from a existing project design of a trebuchet. We cut all of the wood ourselves and screded it together folling the plans that we found on the internet (link below). We had to modify the release mechanism slightly so that it could be pulled by an arduino. We then programmed an arduino to move a servo when a button was pushed. The servo was attached to the release mechanism, therefore when the button was pushed the servo pulled the pin and the arm was released and basically any relatively light object could be thrown with our trebuchet. We had to test and make sure that the sling would actually release the item that was going to be thrown, and we also had to test and make sure that the servo was able to pull the pin and release the throwing arm.

 http://www.wikihow.com/Build-a-Trebuchet-(1-Meter-Scale)

http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/00627/chris_and_zach.html

Code from here:  http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=108375.0

 

Project Challenges & Insights

The first problem we encountered was fairly easy to fix, we had decided to use a very hard wood (oak) for the base. We could screw the screws directly into so we had to drill a pilot hole and then attach the pieces of the base and supports with the screws. The other problem we encountered was how to make the release mechanism for the throwing arm automatic. We knew that we wanted to use the servo to make it fire but we had to figure out something that would be light enough for the servo to pull. We ended up using a chain with a small pin that when pulled out released the arm, kind of like a grenade. The biggest problem was getting the ball to come out of the sling properly. We tried making the sling out of cloth, rubber bands and tape, and cardboard. Either the ball came out before the arm go to the top of its swing, throwing the ball backwards, or else is didn’t come out of the sling at all. We actually were not able to fix this problem, so our trebuchet was not fully functional. 

Project Video

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Final Project Report – Team Amazing

Project Summary

Our project used an Arduino that controlled solenoids cause piano hammers to hit metal tubes that are tuned to the C scale. We based our project off of the music box project.

Team Members

Robert Osborne-Programming, electronics.

Matthew Barnes-Building, design.

Jordan Steinbrock-Building, design.

Josh Chase-Building, design, video, pictures.

Project Design & Development

Our project combined aspects from a few of the previous projects. We used the metal chimes from the first project. Then we based what we wanted our project to do off of the Arduino song player project. To test our project we powered the solenoids to be sure that the hammers could hit the correct spot.

Our wiring

Our program:Final_Project_Programming

http://cratel.wichita.edu/blogs/engr101fall2013gridley/assignments/me-motor-project/

http://cratel.wichita.edu/blogs/engr101fall2013gridley/assignments/arduino-song-player/

Project Challenges & Insights

The biggest challenge we had was figuring out how we could make the piano hammers hit the chimes. Originally we wanted to use a way similar to hitting a piano key, but that turned out to be too complicated. We then found that we could attach the solenoid to strings that were already attached to the hammers and use them to pull the hammer. One thing we learned from this project was to use things in creative ways to solve problems.

Project Video

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Final Project Report – Team ATA

Project Summary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Team Members

Alex Harrison, Tom Wineland, Austin Griffith 

Project Design & Development

Our project was designed to make solar panels more efficient. The idea was to put several light sensors on a moving arm with the right programming that would move the solar panel towards the light, thus making them more efficient. It was made up of two motors, an Adruino, a circuit board, and lots of wires. We hot glued the motors together and soldered the wires together.  Most of the testing went well. The robotic arm follows where ever the light is the strongest.

Insturctables link: http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Solar-Tracker/Project Challenges & Insights

Program code link: http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Solar-Tracker/step5/The-Code/

The first problem was figuring out how to put the motors together. how we put them on first  made the two resist each other. Simple trial and error fixed this problem. The next problem was getting the motors to stay on top of each other without falling. it took several hot glue attempts but after flooding them in hot glue, it ended up working out. One of the main problems was that the arm did  the opposite of what we wanted it to do. It would go to where the light was the weakest. We looked at the programming to see if that was the flaw but nothing seemed wrong there. So we just reversed the motors again and it worked like a charm. The last and biggest problem was that the solar panel did not actually fit on the robotic arm. It was way to heavy and large.  We could not fix this problem in the given time span. If we could do anything differently we would either make a bigger arm or buy a smaller solar panel. What we learned from this project that in order to move a small robotic arm is takes 6 volts. The area of solar panels needed to gain back the energy needed was upwards of a mile. This project would not be economical unless on a large scale.

 

Project Video

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Final Project Report – Team Paper Airplane

Project Summary

The paper airplane launcher has the biggest problem of being hard to balance the motors.  The idea of having a motorized paper airplane launcher is moving me to wonder the longest distances of a paper airplane? 

 

Team Members

Ben Cardiff

Project Design & Development

the original that was discovered online used two personal fans to power the launcher. I have decided to use a bigger motor that I can use up to 12 volts and possibly more.  ( I had not tested for more.) The only real problem that a motorized paper airplane launcher alleviates is possibly a sore arm, then there is a chance for far launches.  After my initial test run with the bigger motors I have had to add more weight to in order to keep if from moving around while it is running.  

Project Challenges & Insights

The challenges mostly had to do with the disks being off balanced.  that was corrected by remaking the disks. 

 

Final Project Proposal – Team Top Gear

Project Proposal Summary

Build a model of 1972 Chevelle cut on the foam cutter.  It will be powered by a DC motor and steerable with a servo.  It will be controlled by an Arduino with a Bluetooth link allowing remote control.

 

Team Members

Israel Taylor

Chase Minor

Final Project Proposal- Team Paper Airplane

Project Proposal Summary

I am going to make an airplane launcher that can launch foam and paper airplanes.  Using compact discs, hobby foam, a couple of dc motors and set it all into a stand.  I will try to make it launch as big a variety of foam and paper airplanes.   

Team Members

Ben Cardiff

Final Project Proposal – Team ATA

Project Proposal Summary

We plan to make a solar panel that will track the sun. The main purpose of this is to have the solar panel at maximum capacity throughout the day. If it is always pointed at the sun then this is attainable. We would use feedback from the solar panel to track how much more efficient it is when pointed at the sun and at different times of the day. The software is mostly given on Instructables.com and requires little adding. We will finish it off with an awesome video!

Team Members

Alex Harrison, Tom Winleand, Austin Griffith

Final Project Proposal – Team Piano

Project Proposal Summary

Our project will be a light piano, consisting of a ten key spectrum. Each key will sense for the light to be covered and then play according notes or tones. We are still deciding but we might include a MIDI aspect from the computer to be able to choose between different instruments instead of just solely the piano. In addition to playing notes, each key will have an attached LED that will light up whenever the note is played just to add some cool color effect. Since the light sensors are analog and the arduino only have 6 analog pins, we will have to use another 4 digital pins instead of analog to get the 10 required pins.

Team Members

Blake Jackson

Mohammed Alyami

Dmitry Foster