Final Product Survey

Date: Monday, December 09, 2013

 

1. Is it easy to move the joystick?
    It is very easy.

2. Is the input given to the joystick and the movement of the camera as predicted?
    Yes, it is as predicted.

3. How much will you be willing to pay for the product like this?
     $150 – $200

4. Are you able to mount the camera control system easily on the wheelchair?
     No, require help and tools.
 

5. Are you able to mount and release the camera easily from the system?
    Yes, I am

6. Overall, was the product effective in assisting you to take pictures?
     Yes, love the product and looking forward to use it.

 

Usability Study –        Meeting 1

Date –   Nov 14, 2013

Participants -               Saeed Alsaleeb

                                    Bill Drescher

                                    Kusay Kharmandh

                                    Rupak Poudel

                                    Shari Rose

                                    Participants were the design team and the project client.

Training -                     Product demonstration and verbal instruction.

Evaluation -                 Observation and verbal responses.

 

Results  –  At this meeting, our main purpose was to test the mounting of the Camera Control System to the wheelchair and get Shari’s comments. The mount we brought to the meeting was obviously way too long (high), so we discussed alternate designs. We mounted Shari’s SLR camera on the device (on a table), to demo it, and discovered that the motor stop torque was insufficient to hold the camera tilt platform in place. (The motor had enough torque to move the camera, but after a certain angle was exceeded, the tilt platform continued to move when the motor was unpowered.) Shari observed that the joystick control lever was very short, and that a longer one might be easier to use.

 

Actions Taken – A new higher torque motor was ordered and installed. The new motor has 2,995 in.-oz. of torque compared to the old motor’s 613 in.-oz. of torque.  It is also slower; 1 RPM vs. 6 RPM. Two possible new mounts were designed and drawn, and transmitted to Greg Carpenter at the CPRF machine shop for his evaluation and construction. Greg decided to build the mount that consisted of two tubes ~.75 inch in diameter, welded together at a right angle. A new longer (3”) joystick lever was designed and 3D printed on the Thing-O-Matic.

 

 

Usability Study –        Meeting 2

Date –        Nov 19, 2013

Participants -               Saeed Alsaleeb

                                    Bill Drescher

                                    Kusay Kharmandh

                                    Rupak Poudel

                                    Shari Rose

                                    Participants were the design team and the project client.

Training -                     Product demonstration and verbal instruction.

Evaluation -                 Observation and verbal responses.

 

Results – Again at this meeting, our main purpose was to test the new mounting of the Camera Control System to the wheelchair and get Shari’s comments. Trying the new mount, two problems were apparent. One problem was that putting the down-tube of the mount into an open, vertical tube of Shari’s wheel chair resulted in the device rotating under the influence of gravity. The second problem was that the mount still positioned the camera too high for comfortable use. The new motor now held the camera tilt platform in position when the motor was unpowered. Shari was OK with the slower tilt motion of the camera, and stated that she might prefer the slower speed, as it would allow more accurate pointing of the camera. Shari observed that the camera mount locking lever that to be thrown to allow the camera to be switched from landscape to portrait orientation was small, and difficult for her to operate. She didn’t like the idea we proposed to mount the joystick controller separately, and connect it to the main box via wires. Shari asked if we could mount the joystick onto the main box. After some discussion it was decided to mount the controller on the back of the box, and that the old, smaller lever would be preferable in this position. The quick disconnect feature of the camera mount was tested, and Shari considered it to be acceptable.

 

Actions Taken  – Tom McGuire had provided us with a wheelchair tube mounting clamp earlier in the semester to try, but we thought we knew better. This was located, dusted off, and found to fit the Camera Control System mounting tube. A new, longer camera mount locking lever was designed and 3D printed on the Thing-O-Matic. New holes were cut in the back of the box and the old, smaller joystick control lever was attached. (It didn’t come up in the usability testing with the client, but at this time we realized that the electrical power circuit didn’t have an on-off switch. A small toggle switch was added to the power circuit and mounted to the back of the box. Labels reading “ON” and “OFF” were printed and added to the box.)

 

Usability Study –        Meeting 3

Date –          Nov 21, 2013

Participants -               Saeed Alsaleeb

                                    Bill Drescher

                                    Kusay Kharmandh

                                    Rupak Poudel

                                    Shari Rose

                                    Participants were the design team and the project client.

Training -                     Product demonstration and verbal instruction.

Evaluation -                 Observation and verbal responses.

 

Results – The wheelchair tube mounting clamp fit and allowed us to mount the device lower on the tube. The resulting height was judged to be ‘perfect’, and the device is securely positioned and no longer moves under the influence of gravity. The side of the clamp that holds the device is lever actuated, and Shari can use it to remove the camera control system herself. The clamp can be positioned so that Shari can still use the loop of the tube it is clamped to. Unfortunately, the side of the clamp attached to the wheelchair is secured with bolts, and takes tools to remove. The new camera mount locking lever was considered to be acceptable, but a longer length would be better. However, a longer lever would hit the camera body when the camera is moved to the portrait position. Shari was very pleased with the positions of the joystick control lever and on-off power switch.